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Posts Tagged ‘Tashaki Miyaki’

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Crying My Heart Out

Young Galaxy offer up deluxe shade of Ultramarine

Photo By Vanessa HeinsVanessa HeinsI’m going to resist the urge to rail against the whole idea of the “deluxe edition” of an album being issued just months after the original issue. The reasons of why it’s a shitty-ass trend are self-evident and the quite clearly, it’s not going away anytime soon as labels keep doing it, meaning the fans keep buying it. Perhaps the correct perspective to look at it is that since physical singles and EPs are basically relics of a bygone age, the avenues to release b-sides and unreleased stuff are far fewer than they once were so maybe, mathematically speaking, buying the same record twice is about on par with buying all those singles and more space-efficient, to boot. I don’t know if I actually believe it, but I’ll go with that for now and move on.

At the least, the bonus materials should be worthwhile and from the looks of the expanded, double-disc edition of Young Galaxy’s Polaris-shortlisted Ultramarine, they are. There’s two edits of their new single, streamable below, both sides of last year’s sold out “Shoreless Kid” 7″, a couple more unreleased original songs and the requisite remixes, and perhaps most importantly, it’s reasonably priced. It’s coming out on September 24, the day after it could conceivably be crowned as Polaris champ. Not saying it’s going to happen, but it could. Exclaim has specifics on the reissue and CBC Music has a quick chat with Young Galaxy keyboardist/guitarist Matthew Shapiro.

Stream: Young Galaxy – “Crying My Heart Out”

The National Post and Exclaim talk with Diana songwriters Joseph Shabason and Kieran Adams. They play The Great Hall on September 26.

Exclaim has posted this month’s cover story on Braids online, and there’s further writeups at The Montreal Gazette and The Halifax Chronicle-Herald. They play The Great Hall in support of the just-released Flourish//Perish on November 10.

And tangentially and unexpectedly, Diana frontwoman Carmen Elle, as well as Braids’ Raphaelle Standell-Preston, are featured in a New York Times fashion spread. So that’s unexpected.

CBC Music and The Montreal Gazette talk to Murray Lightburn about going solo on Mass:Light.

The 405, Victoria Times-Colonist, NOW, and Interview get to know Sarah Neufeld; she’s at The Drake Underground on August 22.

Though they’ve already shown off all kinds of ingenious promotional ideas to lead up to the September 3 release of The Silver Gymnasium, Okkervil River have topped themselves with an 8-bit video game that lets you explore Will Sheff’s youth while assembling the Triforce, pursuing the Death Angel, and knocking out Piston Honda. See a higher-res and more grown-up version of Sheff when he leads his band into The Phoenix on September 28.

PopMatters has an interview with Colin Stetson, who has had to drop off the Constellation Records showcase at The Great Hall on September 5 on account of a hand injury. He’s not just a pair of lungs, you know.

BrooklynVegan has an interview with Mike Haliechuk of Fucked Up, who’ve finally traded in their Blogspot account for a proper website and filled it with all kinds of streamable rarities. They play 1st Thursday at the AGO on September 5.

The Darcys are streaming another new track from their forthcoming Warring, out September 17, via The AV Club and drummer Wes Marskell gives Thrillist a list of his favourite Toronto eateries. And oh, they’ve offered up the stems of their new song “The River” so you can make and submit remixes. So go to that, if it’s your bag, just don’t send them to me.

Stream: The Darcys – “Muzzle Blast”

Black Book interviews Nick Thorburn of Islands about their new record Ski Mask. It’s out September 17 and they play The Garrison on October 10.

Basia Bulat has used footage from her AGO 1st Thursday performance in January for the first video from Tall Tall Shadow. Paste has the premiere, the album is out October 1, and she plays at the Polish Combatants Hall on October 10 and 11.

Video: Basia Bulat – “It Can’t Be You”

Though her September 10 date at The Drake supporting Lightning Dust is still a couple weeks away, Louise Burns has been announced as support for Hannah Georgas at The Great Hall on November 2.

Video: Louise Burns – “Emeralds Shatter”

Though they’ve yet to release any samples from their new record Static, coming October 15, Cults have announced a Fall tour that brings them to Lee’s Palace on November 25.

MP3: Cults – “Go Outside”

The Daily Swarm talks to Alex Edkins of METZ. The Ottawa Citizen also has a feature.

Noisey gets to know Los Angeles trio Tashaki Miyaki, who should really put some new music out.

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Would That Not Be Nice

Divine Fits show their band is real

Photo via FacebookFacebookIt would seem to be a mathematical and scientific fact that Divine Fits – the band meticulously assembled from the Britt Daniel quarter of Spoon, the Dan Boeckner half of Handsome Furs/quarter of Wold Parade, and Sam Brown quarter of New Bomb Turks – would be a swaggering rock juggernaut, but what works on paper or even in a lab setting doesn’t necessarily translate to real world settings.

So with the August 28 release of their debut album A Thing Called Divine Fits still a few weeks off, the world got its first taste of Divine Fits the other night when in advance of their first announced gigs – one in the hometown of each of the three principals of the band – they hit the Continental Club in Austin and by all accounts, it went over like gangbusters. Ultra8201 has got some videos of their inaugural performance, while Spin, Columbus Alive, and Donewaiting have interviews with the band about who they are and how they came to be.

And in addition to those hometown performances, the band have begun booking shows in other cities – including Toronto. They’ll be at Lee’s Palace on September 5, tickets $20 and on sale now.

Stream: Divine Fits – “My Love Is Real”
Stream: Divine Fits – “Would That Not Be Nice”

Quite pleased to see that LA’s Tashaki Miyaki are finally coming to town, but not so happy that it’s tonight as a last-minute-ish support act for Florence & The Machine at The Molson Amphitheatre (it was originally supposed to be the UK’s Spector but I guess that didn’t end up happening). I saw them at SXSW and their dreamy, Mazzy Star-ish garage pop went down real good, yes it did. I don’t expect their presence to sell any tickets but if you’re already going, I would suggest showing up early enough to see them – they’re on at 8. Spin has a stream of a new song and Spoonfed an interview. Update: Thanks to Mechanical Forest Sound for pointing out that they’ve also got their own show at The Garrison on Saturday night. THAT you should go to.

MP3: Tashaki Miyaki – “Somethin’ Is Better Than Nothin'”
Stream: Tashaki Miyaki – “Paisley Spangled Jangler”

James Mercer of The Shins talks to Spinner about the joys of analog recording; they’re at The Molson Amphitheatre on August 4 opening up for The Black Keys.

Interview and The Village Voice talk to Al Spx of Cold Specks. They play The Great Hall on August 8.

Chan Marshall of Cat Power discusses the heartbreak that led to her new record Sun with Exclaim. It’s out September 4.

Drowned In Sound conversates with J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr. Their new album I Bet On Sky is out September 18 and they’re at Lee’s Palace on September 24, 25, and 26.

San Francisco’s Fresh & Onlys have made a date at The Shop Under Parts & Labour for November 14. Their new record Long Slow Dance is out September 4. The Bay Bridged has an interview and DIY a video session.

MP3: The Fresh & Onlys – “Waterfall”
MP3: The Fresh & Onlys – “Do You Believe In Destiny?”

The Line Of Best Fit, Macleans, The Sydney Morning Herald, and The Age interview Metric. They play The Air Canada Centre on November 14.

The Skinny gets School Of Seven Bells to put on their reviewer hats for a batch of recent singles.

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

SXSW 2012 Night Three A/V

Photo By Frank YangFrank YangWe’re almost done, I swear. The writeup for the Friday night of SXSW 2012 is over here.

Tashaki Miyaki
– Mysterious Los Angeles duo who perform as a trio and prefer nothing to be known about them besides that they dig The Velvet Underground, Everly Brothers and Jesus & Mary Chain who’ve just released the equally mysteriously-titled EP.

Photos: Tashaki Miyaki @ Latitude 30 – March 16, 2012
MP3: Tashaki Miyaki – “Somethin’ Is Better Than Nothin'”
Video: Tashaki Miyaki – “Best Friend”
Video: Tashaki Miyaki – “Somethin’ Is Better Than Nothin'”
Video: Tashaki Miyaki – “Get It Right”
Stream: Tashaki Miyaki / EP

Fort Lean
– Brooklyn-based five-piece that sounds like what you’d expect a Brooklyn-based five-piece in 2012 to sound like; all dreamy guitars and complex rhythms. They’re in town at Lee’s Palace on April 14 opening for We Were Promised Jetpacks. The Vinyl District and EastScene have features on the band.

Photos: Fort Lean @ Karma Lounge – March 16, 2012
MP3: Fort Lean – “Sunsick”
Video: Fort Lean – “Beach Holiday”
Video: Fort Lean – “High Definition”
Video: Fort Lean – “Perfect”
Stream: Fort Lean / Fort Lean

Razika
– Just another Norwegian all-girl ska-pop band; a dime a dozen. Just kidding about that latter part – a bit understated but fun times.

Photos: Razika @ The Iron Bear – March 16, 2012
MP3: Razika – “Eg Vetsje”
MP3: Razika – “Nytt pa Nytt”
Video: Razika – “Vondt i hjertet”

Team Me
– Exuberant gang of Norwegian youths with a penchant for acting out (in a good way). Their debut To The Treetops came out earlier this month.

Photos: Team Me @ The Loft – March 16, 2012
MP3: Team Me – “With My Hands Covering Both of My Eyes I Am Too Scared To Have a Look At You Now”
Video: Team Me – “Dear Sister”
Video: Team Me – “Show Me”

Howler
– Youthful Minneapolis outfit who’ve been tagged as the next saviours of garage rock. Whether it’s actually true or just hyperbole, their debut America Give Up is pretty good and their live show is better; see for yourself at The Drake Underground on April 5. The Vancouver Sun, Georgia Straight, and San Francisco Examiner have feature pieces on the band.

Photos: Howler @ Latitude 30 – March 16, 2012
MP3: Howler – “Back Of Your Neck”
Video: Howler – “Back Of Your Neck”
Video: Howler – “Told You Once”

2:54
– London-based Thurlow sisters who recall the goth- and dream-pop acts of the ’80s with an added dose of sultriness. Their self-titled debut is due on May 28; look for them in Toronto for NXNE – June 15 at Lee’s Palace, to be precise – as part of a North American tour. The Fly has an interview with the pair.

Photos: 2:54 @ Latitude 30 – March 16, 2012
Stream: 2:54 – “You’re Early”
Video: 2:54 – “You’re Early”
Video: 2:54 – “Scarlet”

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

SXSW 2012 Night Three

Howler, Team Me, Tashaki Miyaki and more at SXSW

Photo By Frank YangFrank YangOstensibly, SXSW is a festival meant to expose new music to the world and vice versa, so the fact that I’d spent the past evening and afternoon seeing established artists – I think Springsteen counts as established – rather than seeking out something new wasn’t lost on me. So the festival’s Friday night was devoted wholly to discovery. Onwards!

Los Angeles’ Tashaki Miyaki are working the “mysterious” angle, declining to offer information about their identities – she sings and drums and goes by Lucy, he plays guitar and is called Rocky and at Latitude 30 they were joined by an unnamed bassist/vocalist – and letting the music speak for them. I’d briefed myself with their debut EP on the way down to Austin and was led to expect some lo-fi, fuzzy garage pop but live, they were much cleaner and more precise with the vocals more up front, the harmonies intricate and the guitars reminiscent of Neil Young at his Crazy Horsiest. Their debts to The Velvet Underground are obvious – “If Not For You” is basically “Sweet Jane” – but they spend it in a boutique dealing in ’90s shoegaze. Despite looking, um, great, they weren’t the most charismatic outfit and are operate in a pretty clearly defined niche – it just happens to be my niche.

The longer you go to SXSW, the more venues show up on your no-go list; some rooms are just terrible for seeing a show. Of course, that the rooms seem to change names every year or so makes it difficult to maintain said list – it has happened that I’ve gone to what I thought was a new room and discovered it was an old hated room, Vice/Exodus I’m looking in your direction – but rarer is finding the same name in a different location. So it was that I gave Karma Lounge another shot, seeing as how it was no longer a gross upper level on 8th St but a new (?) street-level bar on 5th. So of course when I got there, everyone was dancing to Ginuwine. Maybe ironically. I don’t know. The point of this story is also unclear to me. But I was there, I was a bit confused and I was waiting for New York’s Fort Lean, whom I’d not heard but had heard good things about. And once they got underway, they were fine but not especially inspiring. The musicianship was impressive and there was clearly lots of ideas and creativity at work, with a base of old school rock’n’roll and jazzy/r&b flourishes to the vocals, but the songs seemed to lack passion. It’s not something that I’d say was specific to Fort Lean but is rather endemic in American indie rock nowadays. Wonder what things are like in, oh, Norway?

Well if Razika, playing the Iron Bear not far from where the original Karma Lounge was, were any indication, ska-pop is much more in vogue in Bergen – at least amongst the early-20’s girl-band set. Okay, probably not a good sample group but still a fun time. They were playing their seventh and final show in three days and despite being justifiably and visibly tired, they mustered up the energy for a strong finish. They played simple, bouncy pop tunes – clean and strummy without a distortion pedal in sight – and though the Norwegian half of their bilingual set was incomprehensible to me, the singalong qualities were pretty clear – you don’t need Google Translate for “whoa whoa whoa”. Basic but plenty likeable, even beyond the foreign novelty factor.

Here’s a thing about SXSW – where else can you see two young Norwegian bands, back to back, in different venues? Besides in Norway, that is. Post-Razika, I hoofed it back to the chaos of 6th St to see Oslo’s Team Me, whose debut To The Treetops! had gotten a worldwide release at the end of February. The musical gang of exuberant youths angle isn’t any new thing – every country seems to have at least a few – but if you were to put Team Me into a Hunger Games/Battle Royale scenario against, say, Los Campesinos!, I would give the edge to the Norwegians and not just because they come from Viking stock. Like their peers, they specialized in amped up twee-pop that made it feel like a drag to be old, but they managed to keep things on the right side of the enthusiastic/annoying line throughout the course of their set. I’d only heard their EP before arriving in Austin so I was pleased to hear by way of the unfamiliar material that they’d already matured in the songwriting department from those tunes. It’s to their credit that the irresistible fun of their performance was able to get me to shelve my, “I’ve seen/heard this before” reservations and just enjoy it.

Minnesota’s Howler came into the festival with a pretty good head of hype behind them – mostly thanks to the enthusiasm of the UK music press – and were perhaps even ready for the backlash stage of the media cycle; I get the sense that some would have been perfectly happy for them to fall flat during SXSW so they could play the “overrated” card. That backlash may yet happen, but it wouldn’t be because of their official showcase back at Latitude 30. They looked a combination of stylishly tousled and lazily disheveled but didn’t come with any sort of pretense – the Strokes comparisons they’re frequently saddled with certainly didn’t extend that far. Instead, they were exactly what they purported to be – five young men with a sharp if occasionally sophomoric sense of humour and a propensity for writing and playing good rock music and having a blast doing it. They blew through their 30-minute set with gusto and no small amount of anarchy – more than you might expect from their debut America Give Up and largely thanks to the axe flailing – meant in the best way – of lead guitarist Ian Nygaard. Despite liking the record, I counted myself somewhat skeptical heading into the show – consider me convinced. Howler play The Drake Underground on April 5.

The venue went from Brit-beloved to Brit-bred for the final act of the night, 2:54. Led by a pair of sisters, the four-piece has been framed as a dreampop/shoegazey kind of band but really, they’re more aggressively seductive than dreamy, with dark, goth-y tones. Lead guitarist Hannah Thurlow might prefer to examine her shoes than put on a show, but guitarist-vocalist Colette Thurlow has no problem making eye contact and holding it, all with a bit of a snarl; certainly more Siouxsie than Slowdive. I could do with a little more melody and less moodiness in their sound, but with the band having just signed with Fat Possum for the North American release of their self-titled debut on May 28, I’ll probably be hearing more of them either way.

See? All new bands on Friday night. Get off my case.

Elsewhere: Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard have reconvened as Dead Can Dance and are targeting a Summer release for a new record. So confident are they that this will be the case, that they’ve booked a North American tour – their first in some seven years – for late Summer that includes an August 23 date at the Sony Centre in Toronto, with tickets at the $49.50, $67.50, and $99.50 price points.

Video: Dead Can Dance – “The Carnival Is Over”

Florence Welch of Florence & The Machine tells NME that there may some sort of collaboration with Dev Hynes of Blood Orange in the works. Blood Orange is opening up some of her dates this Summer, though not August 2 at The Molson Amphitheatre.

eMusic and The AV Club chat with David Gedge of The Wedding Present. They’re at The Horseshoe on Sunday night, March 25.

So those My Bloody Valentine remasters/reissues that have been promised since the band reunited four years ago but have been constantly pushed back? Well DIY reports that they’re finally really truly going to come out on May 7, and in addition to the double-disc sets of Loveless and Isn’t Anything, there’ll be a third release entitled EP’s 1988-1991 which, as the name cryptically implies, collects the EPs and singles of the era as well as some unreleased material. I guess we may as well believe it will happen because it doesn’t really make a difference if we don’t.

Video: My Bloody Valentine – “Soon”

Whilst we’re back in the UK of the ’90s, let’s meet up with PopMatters who’ve a piece on the greatness of Swervedriver and another one that celebrates the 20th anniversaries this month of The Charlatans’ Between 10th and 11th and Ride’s Going Blank Again. Twenty. Yes. Old. You. Me. All.

Taking the noise-pop and eading back to Norway, Drowned In Sound talks to The Megaphonic Thrift, who’ve just released their second self-titled album last week.

Stream: The Megaphonic Thrift – “Raising Flags”
Video: The Megaphonic Thrift – “Moonstruck”

The Village Voice and The New York Daily News profile First Aid Kit, in town at The Great Hall on April 4.

eMusic talks to the founders of the great Swedish label Labrador. Who’d have guessed that a desire to not sign Stars would lead to their “Swedes only!” roster policy!